Epidemiological Trends of Dengue Disease in Mexico (2000–2011): A Systematic Literature Search and Analysis

Collection with item attached
2014_11
Item details URL
http://open-repository.kisti.re.kr/cube/handle/open_repository/2153.do
DOI
http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pntd.0003158
journal_title
PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases
eissn
1935-2735
publisher_name
Public Library of Science
article_id
10.1371/journal.pntd.0003158
article_title
Epidemiological Trends of Dengue Disease in Mexico (2000–2011): A Systematic Literature Search and Analysis
surname
Dantés
given_names
Héctor Gómez
email
hector.gomez@insp.mx
address
Instituto Nacional de Salud Pública, Cuernavaca, Morelos, México
surname
Farfán-Ale
given_names
José Arturo
address
Hideyo Noguchi Institute, Mérida, Yucatán, México
surname
Sarti
given_names
Elsa
address
Sanofi Pasteur, Coyoacan, Mexico D.F., Mexico
pub_date:2014-11-06
history_received:2013-10-10
history_accepted:2014-08-03
volume
8
issue
11
title
Author Summary
p
Dengue disease is a tropical and subtropical mosquito-borne viral illness, and is a major public health concern in all endemic countries. Our aim was to determine the impact of dengue disease on the Mexican population over time, and to identify future research priorities and challenges of the surveillance system. To do this, we conducted a systematic literature review to describe the knowledge and gaps in the epidemiology of dengue disease. We used well-defined methods to search and identify relevant epidemiologic research conducted in Mexico between 2000 and 2011. This long-term review highlights an increase in the incidence of dengue disease—as well as in the number of severe cases and deaths in Mexico. Gaps in epidemiological knowledge regarding local serotype distribution, genotype evolution, age-stratified incidence and prevalence, hospitalization rates, underreporting rates as well as primary and secondary infections of dengue provide several avenues for future research. Improved epidemiological data from enhanced surveillance strategies (such as incorporating sentinel sites, more private health units, and information technologies) are required to enable evaluation of disease prevention and management interventions.
copyright
© 2014 Dantés et al This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.


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