Epidemiological Trends of Dengue Disease in Thailand (2000–2011): A Systematic Literature Review

Collection with item attached
2014_11
Item details URL
http://open-repository.kisti.re.kr/cube/handle/open_repository/2145.do
DOI
http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pntd.0003241
journal_title
PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases
eissn
1935-2735
publisher_name
Public Library of Science
article_id
10.1371/journal.pntd.0003241
article_title
Epidemiological Trends of Dengue Disease in Thailand (2000–2011): A Systematic Literature Review
surname
Limkittikul
given_names
Kriengsak
address
Faculty of Tropical Medicine, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand
surname
Brett
given_names
Jeremy
address
sanofi-aventis Singapore Pte Ltd, Singapore
surname
L'Azou
given_names
Maïna
email
Maina.Lazou@sanofipasteur.com
address
Global Epidemiology Department, Sanofi Pasteur, France
pub_date:2014-11-06
history_received:2013-07-26
history_accepted:2014-09-04
volume
8
issue
11
p
A literature survey and analysis was conducted to describe the epidemiology of dengue disease in Thailand reported between 2000 and 2011. The literature search identified 610 relevant sources, 40 of which fulfilled the inclusion criteria defined in the review protocol. Peaks in the number of cases occurred during the review period in 2001, 2002, 2008 and 2010. A shift in age group predominance towards older ages continued through the review period. Disease incidence and deaths remained highest in children aged ≤15 years and case fatality rates were highest in young children. Heterogeneous geographical patterns were observed with higher incidence rates reported in the Southern region and serotype distribution varied in time and place. Gaps identified in epidemiological knowledge regarding dengue disease in Thailand provide several avenues for future research, in particular studies of seroprevalence.
title
Protocol registration
p
PROSPERO CRD42012002170
title
Author Summary
p
We conducted this comprehensive systematic review to determine the impact of dengue disease in Thailand for the period 2000–2011, and to identify future research priorities. Well-defined methods were used to search and identify relevant published research, according to predetermined inclusion criteria. In addition to information from studies published in the literature, the review draws largely on surveillance data from the Annual Epidemiological Surveillance Reports published by the Thailand Ministry of Public Health. The pattern of annual number of reported dengue cases over the review period was complicated by epidemic years; consequently, a trend in the number of reported cases could not be identified. It was apparent that despite a shift in age group distribution dengue from younger towards older persons, dengue in Thailand remains a predominantly childhood disease. The seasonality and heterogeneous spatial and temporal nature of the disease were confirmed. It is clear that the nationwide passive surveillance system is a source of consistent data relating to severity, age and serotype. However, several gaps were identified that would benefit the understanding of dengue epidemiology in Thailand, such as seroprevalence data and a record of the proportion of reported cases that are hospitalized.
copyright
© 2014 Limkittikul et al This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.


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